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ADHD in Women

Are there different degrees of ADHD?


After believing I had ADHD for several years, I was diagnosed a couple of years ago as a senior.  I wish I had known this when I was young but it wasn’t recognized then. 
    I believe I have “mild” ADHD if there is such a thing.  I can’t relate to those with tempers—I am just frustrated much of the time over small things—lost items, time, etc.
I think it is mild because I was a good student in classes that I enjoyed in college—almost a 4 pt average after an initial bad start.  I have excelled at work in an editorial office (but not at home after retiring). There were times I did not use good judgment with superiors.
  Anxiety and some depression off and on all my life (now on Paxil).  Time management is bad and I relate to Barkley’s talk on this, but I am fairly well organized and like a neat home.
  I have many long-time friends and most of them don’t think I have ADHD when I bring it up.
  I was shy and withdrawn in childhood and have never been hyperactive, so I am confused about not fitting the traditional stereotype of ADHD—do I really have it?  I want to do so many things but can’t—I have been successful with exercise but struggle with diet.  I fit so many of the symptoms but not all. Is anyone else confused about their diagnosis?

Replies

It doesn’t sound like you have add/adhd not even mild, I hope your not taking medication for it because you sound like a bright intelligent young lady and if your not add/adhd you shouldn’t be taking medication because it works opposite in people without add/adhd and can cause serious addicting issue for non adhd-ers.

Please be careful and listen to those who love you, they’ll notice if you have add/adhd even before you do.  Good Luck and please be careful

Posted by BexIssues on Dec 05, 2013 at 1:44am

There is no black and white with ADD/ADHD—no “either you have it or you do not have it.”  As to “degrees”, I believe that there are some of us who have more difficulties with it than others.

For example, when you and I were being raised, the parenting was much different.  Parents did more at home to teach us many things that are better learned at home while very young.  Parents were more inclined to help young children with homework and with other skills needed during the early education years.  Discipline was handled differently, too.

If you think that you might have ADD/ADHD, then see a doctor who tests for this and find out for sure either way.  If you are not currently seeing a therapist, find one who works with adult ADD/ADHD and find out what he or she thinks could be going on with you.

I was diagnosed at age 50, which was 17 years ago.  You would not be the first retired person to be diagnosed late in life. 

In the meantime, why not look into some tools and tactics to help yourself?  I use a planner on my computer and COZI Family Organizer online.  I set reminders in my cell phone.  I have a day-planner with me all the time (other than social events) and I use it “religiously”.  Lost items and lost time are a problem for me, too.  But this is being addressed by setting up rules for myself and others in my home.

The rules are simple.  If it is mine then leave it alone.  Do not move things that are in the home (on my desk, in any room).  If you take something out, then put it back where you got it so that I can find it when I go looking for it.  Yes, my husband lives with those rules, too.  He has to.  He is usually the one who moves things and then he does not remember where he put them…  Nobody touches my desk.  My keys are always in the same place.  My purse is always under my desk.  My checkbook is in my bag.  My planner is on my desk or in my bag. 

It may sound weird, but making the rules for myself and others helps me not lose things.

Clocks!  I use clocks and clocks with alarms.  When I know I have to be somewhere I set an alarm so that I get ready in time to go where I need to go.

I really do not care that these things sound odd to other people.  It work for me and in my home, it makes all the difference.  In my life, it gives me more confidence.

I am retired, but busy.  I have things that I have to do and things tha tI want to do.  I can keep it all straight when everyone follows the rules.

I hope some of that is helpful to you.

Posted by Dianne in the Desert on Dec 05, 2013 at 4:08am

Junella,

There are different types of ADHD—Inattentive, Hyperative + Impulsive, and Combined. It sounds like you have Inattentive ADHD but your doctor may not have given you a type with your diagnosis.

Here’s an article on ADDitudeMag.com from an individual who was diagnosed later in life as well and the article describes the different types of ADHD. http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/947.html

ADHD is a very individualized disorder—it has different presentation and intricacies for everyone who has it.

Penny
ADDconnect Moderator & Mom to Tween Boy with ADHD and LDs

Posted by adhdmomma on Dec 05, 2013 at 2:03pm

Agreed, comming from someone who has it, it seems like you have Innatettive Type ADHD.

Lead pretty much the same childhood you described!

Inattentive Type goes easily unnoticed, precisly because the ADHD stereotype is of Hyperactiveness. We just get called lazy, daydreamers, unnmotivated, etc.

I got diagnosed early this year, at 21. Yet I’ve had it all my life.

Posted by Nacho on Dec 10, 2013 at 9:48pm

I have Inattentive ADHD , too. It’s the quiet kind… I think ADHD is on a spectrum…. You can have the Inattentive type, and it can vary in how tough the symptoms are,same with Impulsive type and Hyperactive and Combined types…..as for mine, I feel as though mine is in the middle of the road as far as Inattentive goes…. It’s not mild, but it’s not severe, either…. Just in the middle, if that makes any sense….

Posted by Lilapsophile on Dec 19, 2013 at 12:32am

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