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The best way to get a full measure of your child’s IQ is to do a full testing with a psychologist who can do a Psycho-Educational Evaluation. Some school districts do provide testing but there can be long wait lists. Hopefully your school or pediatrician can recommend a private therapist. It’s costly but there are some insurance plans that cover either part of the expense or almost all of it. When I had my son tested at age 6 I know he would be diagnosed with ADHD but his IQ was 150. I wish I had known more than about giftedness and ADHD and twice-exceptionality. We were given a lot of resources about ADHD but besides being told our son was “very bright”, nothing was shared with us regarding high IQ and how giftedness plays into many emotional and behavioral issues. For some excellent resources on the web: hoagiesgifted.org and SENG (Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted). Definitely read: Misdiagnosis, Dual Diagnosis (Webb. Amend)The information you get from testing is very valuable, good luck!

Posted by LKOC on Mar 17, 2014 at 6:02pm

When I had my son privately tested for ADHD, they included some IQ testing as well.  My insurance covered a portion of the testing.  I also had him tested by the school district for an IEP, and that did NOT include IQ testing, only academic tests that showed whether or not he had learning disabilities that warranted an IEP.

Posted by JAMurphy on Mar 17, 2014 at 6:13pm

My son had an IQ test both in private and school evaluations. I think he’s had an IQ test 4 times now and he’s only 11. If you think your child is bright, read about twice-exceptional kids and how to best help them. It’s really a double-edged sword—people expect your child to do well because they are smart and then don’t understand when they don’t.

Penny
ADDconnect Moderator & Mom to Tween Boy with ADHD and LDs

Posted by adhdmomma on Mar 17, 2014 at 6:33pm

We had to do testing to see if my daughter was eligible for accommodations - our school district does not consider a diagnosis of ADHD adequate, it is not considered a learning disability in our district.  So when they tested and IQ is included.  Found out our daughter is very bright but of course could not show this to teachers because school work and testing didn’t reflect it until meds.

Posted by YellaRyan on Mar 17, 2014 at 11:07pm

YellaRyan - in my district ADHD is considered OHI (other health impairment), not a learning disability.  I don’t think the district gets to pick and choose what constitutes a “learning disability”, I think it is federally defined by IDEA.  Did you look into this further through http://www.wrightslaw.com?  Might be worth checking it out, perhaps I am wrong but I don’t think I am.  An OHI makes a child eligible for a 504 Plan. 

Kelly

Posted by krtsinohio on Mar 18, 2014 at 12:13am

Many public schools (and a few private) have gifted programs (the grade at which they are offered vary by district-some start in elementary school, some in middle school).  In these cases, the teachers recommend the students they feel display gifted qualities- usually creativity or abilities beyond academic excellence, that might include the arts, problem solving, ect.  Many student that make straight A’s are not “gifted”, and many students with borderline grades are.

Of course, for the parent that takes their time to look, every child has a special talent or gift, but it may not be one that a school or teacher will deem the child to be “gifted” because of an IQ score. 

That said, if a parent thinks their child should be recommended for testing for the gifted program, but has not been, they can ask about the school’s procedures and if their child has been considered for it.  Usually the parent has to be requested permission for their child to be tested, but I have heard of (unsubstantiated) schools that screen students without parent permission, and then get permission to test those that pass the screening.

Posted by MollyMS on Mar 18, 2014 at 1:03am

Kelly,

Here’s something I wrote a while back addressing the issue of a diagnosis of ADHD alone qualifying a student under IDEA. It is OHI, but there are more factors than that considered and that’s why so many students with ADHD are denied an IEP and resources.

“So how do you know if your child with ADHD qualifies for special services under IDEA? The definition of “a child with a disability” within the IDEA law spells out eligibility for services under IDEA. Here’s the definition of a child with a disability directly from the law code (author edited to remove portions not applicable to the audience of this book).

§ 300.8   CHILD WITH A DISABILITY.
(A) GENERAL. (1) CHILD WITH A DISABILITY MEANS A CHILD EVALUATED IN ACCORDANCE WITH §§300.304 THROUGH 300.311 AS HAVING INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY**, A HEARING IMPAIRMENT (INCLUDING DEAFNESS), A SPEECH OR LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT, A VISUAL IMPAIRMENT (INCLUDING BLINDNESS), A SERIOUS EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE (REFERRED TO IN THIS PART AS “EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE”), AN ORTHOPEDIC IMPAIRMENT, AUTISM, TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY, AN OTHER HEALTH IMPAIRMENT, A SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITY, DEAF-BLINDNESS, OR MULTIPLE DISABILITIES, AND WHO, BY REASON THEREOF, NEEDS SPECIAL EDUCATION AND RELATED SERVICES…
(C) DEFINITIONS OF DISABILITY TERMS.  THE TERMS USED IN THIS DEFINITION OF A CHILD WITH A DISABILITY ARE DEFINED AS FOLLOWS:…
(4)(I) EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE MEANS A CONDITION EXHIBITING ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING CHARACTERISTICS OVER A LONG PERIOD OF TIME AND TO A MARKED DEGREE THAT ADVERSELY AFFECTS A CHILD’S EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE:
(A) AN INABILITY TO LEARN THAT CANNOT BE EXPLAINED BY INTELLECTUAL, SENSORY, OR HEALTH FACTORS.
(B) AN INABILITY TO BUILD OR MAINTAIN SATISFACTORY INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH PEERS AND TEACHERS.
(C) INAPPROPRIATE TYPES OF BEHAVIOR OR FEELINGS UNDER NORMAL CIRCUMSTANCES.
(D) A GENERAL PERVASIVE MOOD OF UNHAPPINESS OR DEPRESSION.
(E) A TENDENCY TO DEVELOP PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS OR FEARS ASSOCIATED WITH PERSONAL OR SCHOOL PROBLEMS.
(II) EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE INCLUDES SCHIZOPHRENIA. THE TERM DOES NOT APPLY TO CHILDREN WHO ARE SOCIALLY MALADJUSTED, UNLESS IT IS DETERMINED THAT THEY HAVE AN EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE UNDER PARAGRAPH (C)(4)(I) OF THIS SECTION…
(6) INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY ** MEANS SIGNIFICANTLY SUBAVERAGE GENERAL INTELLECTUAL FUNCTIONING, EXISTING CONCURRENTLY WITH DEFICITS IN ADAPTIVE BEHAVIOR AND MANIFESTED DURING THE DEVELOPMENTAL PERIOD, THAT ADVERSELY AFFECTS A CHILD’S EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE…
(9) OTHER HEALTH IMPAIRMENT MEANS HAVING LIMITED STRENGTH, VITALITY, OR ALERTNESS, INCLUDING A HEIGHTENED ALERTNESS TO ENVIRONMENTAL STIMULI, THAT RESULTS IN LIMITED ALERTNESS WITH RESPECT TO THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT, THAT—
(I) IS DUE TO CHRONIC OR ACUTE HEALTH PROBLEMS SUCH AS ASTHMA, ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER OR ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER, DIABETES, EPILEPSY, A HEART CONDITION, HEMOPHILIA, LEAD POISONING, LEUKEMIA, NEPHRITIS, RHEUMATIC FEVER, SICKLE CELL ANEMIA, AND TOURETTE SYNDROME; AND
(II) ADVERSELY AFFECTS A CHILD’S EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE.

As you can see, ADHD is referenced under the eligibility standard of “Other Health Impaired.” Just because ADHD is listed in the law doesn’t mean your child with ADHD is automatically eligible for special education services though, believe me. The law further quantifies it as “chronic” and it must “adversely affect the child’s educational performance.” If your child is doing well in school, they don’t qualify for nor do they need special services and an IEP for ADHD. “Doing well in school” does not mean straight A’s either — it’s more than just grades.

In a letter dated November 2007, The Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs responded to the lack of definition for the eligibility phrase “adversely affects the child’s educational performance” in the IDEA law stating:

“. ..ALTHOUGH THE PHRASE “ADVERSELY AFFECTS EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE” IS NOT SPECIFICALLY DEFINED, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPACT THAT THE CHILD’S IMPAIRMENT OR CONDITION HAS ON THE CHILD’S EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE IS A DECISIVE FACTOR IN A CHILD’S ELIGIBILITY DETERMINATION UNDER PART B [OF IDEA]. WE BELIEVE THAT THE EVALUATION AND ELIGIBILITY DETERMINATION PROCESSES… ARE SUFFICIENT FOR THE GROUP OF QUALIFIED PROFESSIONALS AND THE PARENT TO ASCERTAIN HOW THE CHILD’S IMPAIRMENT OR DISABILITY AFFECTS THE CHILD’S ABILITY TO FUNCTION IN AN EDUCATIONAL SETTING. A RANGE OF FACTORS — BOTH ACADEMIC AND NONACADEMIC — CAN BE CONSIDERED IN MAKING THIS DETERMINATION FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL CHILD. SEE 34 CFR §300.306(C). EVEN IF A CHILD IS ADVANCING FROM GRADE TO GRADE OR IS PLACED IN THE REGULAR EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT FOR MOST OR ALL OF THE SCHOOL DAY, THE GROUP CHARGED WITH MAKING THE ELIGIBILITY DETERMINATION STILL COULD DETERMINE THAT THE CHILD’S IMPAIRMENT OR CONDITION ADVERSELY AFFECTS THE CHILD’S EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE BECAUSE THE CHILD COULD NOT PROGRESS SATISFACTORILY IN THE ABSENCE OF SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONAL ADAPTATIONS OR SUPPORTIVE SERVICES, INCLUDING MODIFICATIONS TO THE GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM. 34 CFR §300.101(C) (REGARDING REQUIREMENTS FOR INDIVIDUAL ELIGIBILITY DETERMINATIONS FOR CHILDREN ADVANCING FROM GRADE TO GRADE).
BASED ON SECTION 607(E) OF THE IDEA, WE ARE INFORMING YOU THAT OUR RESPONSE IS PROVIDED AS INFORMAL GUIDANCE AND IS NOT LEGALLY BINDING, BUT REPRESENTS AN INTERPRETATION BY THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION OF THE IDEA IN THE CONTEXT OF THE SPECIFIC FACTS PRESENTED.

In other words, it’s up to the group of qualified professionals (i.e., your child’s IEP team) and the participating parent to decide if the child’s disability “adversely affects the child’s educational performance.” This determination has been a source of contention for many an IEP Team and parent and will be for years to come. You are essentially at the mercy of the school personnel’s interpretation of the law on this matter (and their special services budget), then you can file for a hearing if you disagree. “

Hope that helps to clarify.

Penny
ADDconnect Moderator & Mom to Tween Boy with ADHD and LDs

Posted by adhdmomma on Mar 18, 2014 at 5:38pm

I second the post regarding the sengifted website.
As a professional, I find myself printing off articles for parents as a resource quite often.

Posted by Dr. Eric on Mar 22, 2014 at 12:44am

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