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Tourette's Syndrome and ADHD

High ritalin dosage in an 8 year old

My DS is 8 and has combined type ADHD. He is currently on 50mg a day of short acting ritalin (have tried long acting and didn’t work). I am getting worried about what will happen as he gets older with his dosage as I am conscious he is not far off the 60mg recommended limit already at 8. Our psychiatrist assures us that it is safe to dose above 60mg if needed but I still worry about it.

The way I have seen his ritalin is that without he can not function. He was in a special school and it was only even he was on medication that he could go to mainstream as he is just too hyper and in attentive without it. To me the developmental benefits he gets from being in a mainstream school far outweigh the risks of meds. He does have behavioural therapy as well but without being medicated he just can not concentrate at all is the behaviour therapy is ineffective unless he is medicated.

I wondered what others experiences are of doses of Ritalin in a child. Does it always increase with age and what is the highest dose- have people gone over 60mg in children safely ?

Replies

Hi catgirl! Since this particular post is not about Tourette’s, you should post it in the Parents of ADHD Children group (http://connect.additudemag.com/groups/group/Parents_of_ADHD_Children/). That group is larger and much more active, so your question will spur a discussion in that group.

Penny
ADDconnect Moderator & Mom to Tween Boy with ADHD and LDs

Posted by adhdmomma on Mar 10, 2014 at 5:38pm

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