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ADHD in Women

How do you get diagnosed??

I have had problems with my memory, problem solving, understanding what people say, spacing out, getting distracted, can’t get organized, can’t drive anymore, because I can’t think clearly enough for so years now.  I’m only being treated for depression.  None of the symptoms I’ve mentioned and so many I can’t think of right now aren’t even being addressed.  I’m 53 and I feel I’ve lost so much of my life, because I can’t think.  I can’t get anything done anymore. 

I don’t know if this is related; but, I’ve also had trouble falling asleep since I was a teenager.  Do any of you also have this problem?

How do you get help?

Replies

Yes, sleep problems are pretty common in ADHD as well.  It’s unfortunate that you may be yet another one of the casualties of health care providers so easily seeing depression but having blinders to ADHD. 

If you’ve mentioned all those other ADHD symptoms but they haven’t been addressed, you should clearly point out how those “fail stickers” seem to be the contributing factors for the depression.  If once you point them out, they don’t scream—“Do ya think maybe I’ve got ADHD and depression that is secondary to all those classic ADHD symptoms?”—it’s definitely time to find another provider who understands Adult ADHD. 

A place to start looking for one of those in your area is http://www.chadd.org.  If none in your area are listed try the health care provider directory at phsychologytoday.com.  If still no luck then calling around and asking.

Posted by BC on Jun 17, 2014 at 8:02pm

I had a sleep study done and they said I don’t stay in the deepest stage of sleep long enough.  They also said (which I already knew) that I have RLS.  Are either of these common in Adult ADD?

Posted by 2Forgetful on Jun 18, 2014 at 2:58am

Here’s an ADHD Self-Test online quiz for women: http://www.additudemag.com/quiz/7/question-1.html. Taking this quiz will help you to know if it’s possible you have ADHD. From there, take these results to your primary care physician and ask for a referral to a psych who can do a proper evaluation and provide treatment.

Penny
ADDconnect Moderator, Author & Mom to Tween Boy with ADHD and LDs

Posted by adhdmomma on Jun 18, 2014 at 6:28pm

Yes, RLS seems to be somewhat higher in ADHD than the general public, and I’ve also read that spending less time in deep sleep is as well.  Here’s a great article:

http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/757.html

Posted by BC on Jun 18, 2014 at 6:33pm

Penny,

I took the test and scored 15 out of the 15.

Do you have to take that 3 hour Neurophych testing to be diagnosed?  Or, can you be diagnosed by just talking with a Psychiatrist?

Thank you.

Sue

Posted by 2Forgetful on Jun 18, 2014 at 7:02pm

Here is a thorough article on getting an ADHD diagnosis: http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/10597.html.

Penny
ADDconnect Moderator, Author & Mom to Tween Boy with ADHD and LDs

Posted by adhdmomma on Jun 18, 2014 at 7:10pm

Another thing to get tested is your thyroid—hypothyroid (low thyroid) is pretty common for women in their 50s and can cause most of the symptoms you’re saying you have.

I just finished reading “Smart But Stuck” by Thomas E. Brown and apparently some women develop ADHD as a symptom of menopause, so that could be a factor as well. So you may want to get a full physical (including the full panel of thyroid testing, not just the basic one) to make sure there isn’t a physical cause for your symptoms.

Posted by cinegirl on Jun 30, 2014 at 4:07am

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