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Management strategies for homeschooling/chores/computer time

I’m looking for a good time management style or system that will help me to manage our computer time vs. chore time.  While myself and my kids are all either ADHD or lean towards that style of thinking, one of my kiddies is what they like to call “oppositionally defiant” and struggles with this daily.  His struggle is probably in part due to my own difficulties in getting organized in a new home.  I’ve scheduled an appointment with an ADHD counselor/coach but it’s not until the end of August and schools starts at the beginning (although we could move it back if we had to.)  Any help now in establishing an ADHD-friendly time management plan that we can follow for the rest of the semester would be HUGELY appreciated!!!

Replies

Structure is an ADHD individual’s best friend. My suggestion is to schedule everything. Have one master schedule for the family (posted where all can see it) and put everything on it, even computer time and chores. For my son, I’ve found that being able to move chores off the list when completed makes it less overwhelming for him. I also try to stick to no more than 2 chores a day, and honor his feelings on occasion when he tells me he needs a break from a chore for a day and I can tell that’s valid.

Here are some more suggestions and strategies for implementing structure and routine for those with ADHD:

http://www.additudemag.com/slideshow/37/
http://www.additudemag.com/slideshow/9/
http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/717.html
http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/683.html
http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/2010.html

Organization comes easy for me, but finding the time to monitor this level of structure I find very difficult. But I keep trying for my kiddo.

Penny
ADDconnect Moderator, Author & Mom to Tween Boy with ADHD and LDs

Posted by adhdmomma on Jul 30, 2014 at 2:03pm

Thanks Penny!  I worked on the schedule again this morning and I feel like I’m making progress.  My main problem is having to stop repeatedly once I begin working on something.  And having kids means having to stop when you’re needed. 
I like the idea of moving chores off when they’re done (I like doing that myself.)  To make our calendar we took the glass panel off of an old screen door and attached it to the wall, making it a mega huge erasey board.  We drew a big calendar and put it behind the glass. That should make it easy for the kids to wipe off chores as they go. 
Anyway, thanks again.  I’ll check out those articles and see if anything inspires me.

Posted by Lizabroo on Jul 30, 2014 at 4:11pm

I managed my self at high school and university by having a weekly timetable (schedule) that had everything on it from getting up in the morning to going to bed at night.
Everything
This was especially needed when I worked and studied part-time.
I also used a calendar that went for several months, not month by month.
When my children were young and at school, I set a timer that switched on power for the TV for only their favourite shows in the afternoon.  Put timer into a metal locked cash box …
At the other end of the scale, I worked from home for a while and I had to force myself to stop and take a break – have a cup of tea, don’t forget lunch, hang out laundry, bring in laundry, and so on – otherwise I hyper-focussed for the whole day.  I put on a music CD and when it stopped after about an hour, I took a short break.
Managing time is critical.

Posted by Bob from Cootamundra on Aug 04, 2014 at 9:38am

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