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Parents of ADHD Children

Spinning

Does anyone have a child with ADHD who randomly spins around? Our son has been doing this for years, and can spin for 15 minutes or more. He never gets dizzy, and will usually be listening to his ipod while he is spinning. I just want to be sure he is not doing damage to himself…this is nearly a nightly occurence.

Replies

Have you have him assessed for Autism? This is something that they frequently do. My son has Autism and his bounces on his ball, rocks back and forth and is comforted by music. Could be a high functioning Autism.

Posted by cheroyley on Jun 10, 2014 at 8:57pm

Have you have him assessed for Autism? This is something that they frequently do. My son has Autism and his bounces on his ball, rocks back and forth and is comforted by music. Could be a high functioning Autism.

Posted by cheroyley on Jun 10, 2014 at 8:57pm

I would have him tested for autism.

Posted by Chelley on Jun 10, 2014 at 9:51pm

Why don’t you get him into a dance class?  He obviously has physical energy he has to expend.  If he likes to spin he might get a lot out of dance.  My daughter didn’t only spin but that was in her repertoire before we got her into dance class.

Posted by YellaRyan on Jun 10, 2014 at 11:37pm

My son does this too (8yrs old) he also spin on the ground on his knees.

Posted by Idamae70 on Jun 11, 2014 at 7:31am

Could definitely go either way—ADHD or high functioning autism.  Are there any other repetitive motor activities you’ve noticed?  How is his social functioning?  Are there subjects he perseverates on?

Posted by BC on Jun 11, 2014 at 8:08am

Yep. This is a sign of and Autistic Spectrum Disorder. You can now give a kid and ADHD and ASD diagnosis both at the same time. Up until last year, clinicians had to choose one or the other.

Other signs of autism include hand flapping, unusual adherence to routines, a desire to only eat particular foods and sensitivity to unfamiliar textures like a new sweater or blanket, the desire to stack and display toys or other objects into a precise pattern instead of playing with them, a lack of interest in other children, the inability engage in make believe play, difficulty maintaining eye contact, a dislike for physical touch and unusually narrow interests like being only interested in dinosaurs or blue cars or Thomas the Train to the exclusion of everything else.

That is not a complete list, but it gives you an idea of what clinicians are looking for. If your son does have an Autistic Spectrum Disorder, he can get additional help to improve function.

The tool used to determine whether a child is autistic or not is called the ADOS.

I hope this information is helpful to you.
Sue H in PC, Ohio

Posted by SueH on Jun 11, 2014 at 1:45pm

Kids with ADHD have vestibular systems that may not be fully matured. Take him for an OT assessment. Try to find an Occupational Therapist who is trained in sensory integration. It’s seems as if your son may be trying to have some sensory needs met. Sensory integration can include swinging,spinning climbing etc.

Posted by Speduc8r on Jun 11, 2014 at 4:26pm

Everyone has covered my two thoughts on what you describe: (1) Autism (repetitive motion is called stimming), or (2) a need for proprioceptive input as part of sensory processing disorder, which could be addressed through occupational therapy.

I don’t think the spinning is dangerous, but it would be good to look for a cause, as that may open a door to more focused treatment for your child.

Penny
ADDconnect Moderator, Author & Mom to Tween Boy with ADHD and LDs

Posted by adhdmomma on Jun 11, 2014 at 4:48pm

We don’t have an issue with spinning but my son does flap his hands on occasion.  Just the other day he did this out of the blue.  I finally asked him why he flaps his hands and he says he feels energy build up in him and this helps him to release it.

Posted by Machelle B on Jun 12, 2014 at 8:20pm

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