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need advice

my son has adhd.he is getting in trouble at school.hitting teachers etc..he is on daytrana.any advice on how to help with his anger?

Replies

How old is your son?  I don’t have any experience w/ Daytrana.  What area of meds is that?  Is it a stimulant like Ritalin, etc.?

Posted by carried748 on Mar 13, 2014 at 11:25pm

he is 6.yes daytrana is a patch.its like the off brand of ritalin.they work good but take 2 hrs to work.

Posted by dlovell on Mar 13, 2014 at 11:41pm

Have you tried behavior therapy?  Or requesting that the school have a behavior therapist come in and pull him out of class for a short time on a weekly basis?  My son is 5 and has ADD/ADHD/ODD and is on Ritalin, but we’ve found that using medication in conjunction behavior therapy is more effective.  In behavior therapy he learns how to identify what emotion he is having and gives him specific coping skills when he’s experiencing a negative emotion, like frustration or anger….which is typically what is going on when he has an aggressive outburst.

Insurance covers at least part of the costs and most state medicaid plans cover all except a small copay.

Posted by AnnMarie2403 on Mar 14, 2014 at 5:13pm

Good morning. My daughter is now 6 years old and is on Methylphenidate CD in pill form. She has ADHD/ODD and it is definitely recommended that you start work with a behavioral therapist ASAP.  She was having problems in school as well but since beginning therapy and medication,  she has been a different child.  She sees one in school twice a week and a private one once a week.  She also sees a psychiatrist once every other month or as needed.  Art therapy is also a very good way to get thru to our kids.  Hope this helps

Posted by MarleysMom on Mar 14, 2014 at 6:26pm

I think the previous advice is very good.  My son is now 8, but was diagnosed ADD/ADHD before he was 4.  We now have him on Stratera, which we had him put on because after a few years of being on Vyvanse we felt that may have been contributing to his anger issues.  He’s also on Oxcarbazepine and Buspirone, which help his anxiety issues, as well as help to keep him calm, overall.  He also sees a therapist (we’re at about every other week right now) and a psych, but the psych doesn’t do much except prescribe the meds.  Our therapist has been a great help.  Between her and us doing our own research, we’ve seen that behavior modification/therapy has really helped my son understand his behavior and help him understand what he needs to do to modify his own behavior.  It’s been a long road for him, but as he’s gotten older, he’s realizing how his behavior affects him and everyone around him, which he didn’t really get before.  I’d also check with your son’s school.  Does he have an IEP (Individualized Education Plan)?  Push for one if he doens’t have one.  The school has to do an assessment if you ask for one, as well as work on accommodations (sp?) for your son if he has an IEP.  Best wishes to you and your son!

Posted by carried748 on Mar 15, 2014 at 10:17pm

Try play therapy depending on age or use a feeling chart.

Posted by Shawnna on Apr 15, 2014 at 9:09am

Make sure he is on an IEP.  The Occupational Therapist needs to make modifications to his environment as needed to decrease his stressors.  She should include sensory-modulation activities and training for the student and the teacher to help him remain calm and focused. Then get the RSP teacher to assist with work modification as needed. The SPeech can help with pragmatics instruction.  The real trick is to stop the behaviors/triggers BEFORE he melts down.

You may wish to try neurofeedback treatment with a good therapist in your area.  I have good results with that approach.

Posted by CFit on Jul 10, 2014 at 10:35pm

As Cfit said above, behavior needs to be part of school accommodaitons when it’s an issue at school. Request (always in writing) that the school perform a Functional Behavior Analysis (FBA) and that they implement a behavior plan tailored based on those results.

As well, learn what you can about modifying behavior at home. When my son was in 2nd grade, he hit his peers any time he perceived that they wronged him or one of his classmates. His neighbor borrowed another student’s yellow crayon without asking, he hit him. It was happening several times a week. Each time, we had a conversation that went something like this:

Mom: Why did you hit Joe?
Son: I don’t know.
Mom: Something must have happened to make you angry.
Son: Joe took Sally’s yellow crayon without asking her first.
Mom: I see. How did that make you feel?
Son: Mad! That’s against the rules. You ask first.
Mom: Is it okay to hit someone to show them you are mad?
Son: No.
Mom: What are some more appropriate ways to show you are angry?
Son: (He lists some things like using words, I would facilitate, but always have the ideas come from him.) Use my words. Tell the teacher. Walk away.
Mom: That’s right. Next time you are mad, how will you show it?
Son: I’ll tell the teacher.
Mom: That’s a great idea you came up with.

After about 8 months, the hitting stopped completely and he has not hit a peer in anger since (over 4 years). We essentially reprogrammed his reflex when someone made him angry. It takes a lot of time and consistency, but it can be done.

ADDitudeMag.com offers some helpful articles on behavior modification techniques for kids with ADHD as well:
http://www.additudemag.com/slideshow/30/
http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/879.html

It gets better as they get older too. Hang in there!

Penny
ADDconnect Moderator, Author & Mom to Tween Boy with ADHD and LDs

Posted by adhdmomma on Jul 14, 2014 at 1:19pm

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